logo-space

ad-1-banner

Entertainment

Funny Videos

Animation

Comdey

Travel & Events

2011 Songs

  • Wave of Aden killings tests Gulf role in Yemen

    Saudi troops walk at their base in Yemen's southern port city of AdenBy Mohammed Ghobari and Yara Bayoumy CAIRO/DUBAI (Reuters) - The recapture of Aden by Gulf Arab coalition troops last summer has failed to provide any respite from Yemen's civil war, with residents facing a wave of bomb and gun attacks that is crippling efforts to stabilize the city. Since July, the Gulf coalition and local security forces have struggled to impose order in Aden, opening the way for Islamic State, al Qaeda and other armed groups to operate there with impunity. The challenges in Aden show how difficult it will be to restore order to a country gripped by months of conflict in which 6,000 have been killed and where Islamist militants have exploited widespread security weaknesses in what Saudi Arabia sees as its backyard.


  • US responses to NKorea nuke, missile tests will upset China

    In this Jan, 27, 2016, file photo, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, left, poses with Chinese President Xi Jinping prior to their meeting at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing. North Korean nuclear and rocket tests are drawing quick responses from the U.S. that will upset a supposed partner against Pyongyang's weapons development _ China. New efforts to toughen missile defense in South Korea and sanctions legislation moving swiftly through Congress could both hurt Chinese interests. The Chinese are concerned the missile defense system could be used against them, and the U.S. sanctions could hit Chinese companies that trade with North Korea. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, Pool, Fiile)WASHINGTON (AP) — North Korean nuclear and rocket tests are drawing quick responses from the U.S. that will upset a supposed partner against Pyongyang's weapons development — China.


  • The eyes in the sky over North Korea

    North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un delivering a speech at a national awards ceremony for nuclear scientistsGlobal concerns over North Korea's latest nuclear test and long-range rocket launch have shone a spotlight on the perennial, high-tech game of hide-and-seek played around Pyongyang's advanced weapons programmes. On the seeking side are analysts using high-resolution images from a circling constellation of commercial satellites to pick up whatever data they can on the North's fast-developing nuclear and ballistic missile capabilities. It's a challenging task that more often than not is reduced to educated guesswork, as the number of clues they have to work with is diminished by an increasingly effective North Korean concealment programme.


  • U.S. stepping up push for ceasefire, aid in Syria: officials

    Syrians line up as they wait to cross into Syria at Oncupinar border crossing in the southeastern city of KilisBy Lesley Wroughton, Arshad Mohammed and Jonathan Landay WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry will push to secure an immediate Syrian ceasefire and aid for civilians ahead of a crucial meeting in Munich this week as he seeks to keep a fragile peace process alive, U.S. officials said. The renewed struggle to salvage diplomacy comes as Syrian opposition figures, Western diplomats and analysts voice concern that peace efforts have been all but doomed by a Russian military push that has shored up Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s hold on power.     Critics of Kerry's approach question whether a ceasefire, if one can be achieved, may come too late.


  • Canada to end bombing missions in Iraq and Syria

    Canada's PM Trudeau takes part in a news conference in OttawaBy David Ljunggren OTTAWA (Reuters) - Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said on Monday Canada would pull out six jets that have been bombing targets in Iraq and Syria, ending a controversial combat role in the fight against Islamic State. "The people terrorized by (Islamic State) every day don't need our vengeance, they need our help." Canada will end its bombing missions by Feb. 22 but keep two surveillance planes in the region as well as refueling aircraft, and triple the number of soldiers training Kurdish troops in northern Iraq to about 200. Officials in the United States welcomed the announcement, which came after sustained diplomatic pressure from major allies to persuade Canada to do as much as possible.


Advertisements

ad-2-full

Upcoming Events

No Posted Events

ad3-1-4ad3-1-4
ad3-1-4ad3-1-4

ad-2-full

ad4-1-2-V

ad4-1-2-V

ad4-1-2-V

ad4-1-2-V

ad4-1-2-V

ad4-1-2-V